Discussion:
Ceramic Insulator strips?
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o***@tubes.com
2017-04-17 20:35:03 UTC
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I was reading an article about recapping tube gear. The guy who wrote
the article said that he soldered ceramic insulator strips to the old
can type multipart electrolytics, then attached single caps to those
strips. This was a while ago, and I dont recall where I saw the article.

I have a PACO signal tracer. It does work, but has a noticable hum. So,
I plan to recap it. There are only 4 paper caps, so that's easy. But
there is a FOUR part electrolytic 20 - 20 - 10 - 10 450V (2 are 350V).
There are at least 6 resistors across those pins, and several wires as
well. That chassis is not very large either. Some sort of strip that
could go to each cap terminal (but insulate if from the original cap
innards) would be ideal.

Anyone know what this guy is talking about?

Yea, I am familiar with the standard terminal strips, but there is not
much room to use those which have a terninal NEXT TO the one that
mormally gets screwed to the chassis. Stuffing the can seems like too
much work.

I did find one NEW two part can, which is 32 - 32 at 500V. (for not too
bad of a price $13). I suppose I could use that to replace the two 20mf
caps, but still have the two 10s to deal with. Finding three part cans
seems near impossible, unless I want to pay ridiculous prices and most
of them are NOS. (For electrolytics, I wont use NOS caps), nor will I
pay $50 or more for an any cap, much less NOS.

Anyone have any idea what these strips are, or know of a place where I
can get at least a 3 part cap for a fair price? (like 20 - 20 - 10 or 20
- 10 - 10)?
Peter Wieck
2017-04-18 12:16:10 UTC
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Here are what they look like, at least two iterations of many.
A standard phenolic strip wold be fine as well. The idea is that the individual points represent the solder lugs of a multi-cap, and one solders individual parts as needed. The only downside of this system is that it takes up considerable real-estate as compared to a single can. If you have a big old Zenith chassis, no problem. But with an more crowded beast, it can be difficult.

Simpler to restuff the can, this way:

https://www.audioasylum.com/cgi/m.mpl?forum=vintage&n=171603

Again, one of many options.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
o***@tubes.com
2017-04-19 19:46:43 UTC
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Post by Peter Wieck
https://ebid.s3.amazonaws.com/upload_big/8/1/0/uo_1482916205-25441-26.jpg
https://sc02.alicdn.com/kf/HTB1cnKsLXXXXXXoapXXq6xXFXXXZ/Electric-Motor-Terminal-Strip.jpg
Here are what they look like, at least two iterations of many.
A standard phenolic strip wold be fine as well. The idea is that the individual
points represent the solder lugs of a multi-cap, and one solders
individual parts as needed. The only downside of this system is that it
takes up considerable real-estate as compared to a single can. If you
have a big old Zenith chassis, no problem. But with an more crowded
beast, it can be difficult.
Post by Peter Wieck
https://www.audioasylum.com/cgi/m.mpl?forum=vintage&n=171603
Again, one of many options.
Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
Ok, these seem too large for my needs.
I'd rather use plain phenolic terminal strips, but finding them these
days is very difficult. Ebay has some that are extremely over priced,
because they are labeled "vintage". I guess my only option is to find
some old tube type tv chassis, and remove/reuse them.

However, I will check into restuffing the cans, except I'll have to find
another way to cut the tops off than a pipe cutter. I'd have to take
this whole thing apart entirely to fit a pipe cutter in it. Maybe my
sawsall will work.... Or just a plain hacksaw blade.
Peter Wieck
2017-04-19 21:11:42 UTC
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You really, really, really!! need to remove the can(s) for restuffing. There are too many reasons for this to list here and not run out of bandwidth.

Making the issue of a tubing cutter moot.

http://bensradioattic.com/item.htm?radio=1020632 Buck a piece.

Mouser: (800) 346-6873
Newark: (800) 300-3888 will answer "Element 14"
DigiKey: (800) 858-3616

1 (area code) 555-1212 works for outside your area. And your phone book will have the state area codes as applicable.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
o***@tubes.com
2017-04-19 21:15:06 UTC
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Post by Peter Wieck
You really, really, really!! need to remove the can(s) for restuffing. There are
too many reasons for this to list here and not run out of bandwidth.
Making the issue of a tubing cutter moot.
http://bensradioattic.com/item.htm?radio=1020632 Buck a piece.
Mouser: (800) 346-6873
Newark: (800) 300-3888 will answer "Element 14"
DigiKey: (800) 858-3616
1 (area code) 555-1212 works for outside your area. And your phone book will
have the state area codes as applicable.
Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
Thanks for the phone numbers.

Also, that web link has the terminal strips that I need, and a lot of
other goodies to look at.
o***@tubes.com
2017-04-19 22:06:17 UTC
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Post by Peter Wieck
You really, really, really!! need to remove the can(s) for restuffing. There are too many reasons for this to list here and not run out of bandwidth.
Making the issue of a tubing cutter moot.
http://bensradioattic.com/item.htm?radio=1020632 Buck a piece.
Mouser: (800) 346-6873
Newark: (800) 300-3888 will answer "Element 14"
DigiKey: (800) 858-3616
1 (area code) 555-1212 works for outside your area. And your phone
book will have the state area codes as applicable.
Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA
Are you sure that Newark number is correct? I called and immediately was
given some survey to answer. No introduction, just the survey. I dont do
surveys, so I hung up.

Mouser is sending me a catalog. DigiKey does not have catalogs, but said
I can call with my list of needs and place the order that way. That
should work...

analogdial
2017-04-18 13:32:00 UTC
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Post by o***@tubes.com
the article said that he soldered ceramic insulator strips to the old
can type multipart electrolytics, then attached single caps to those
strips. This was a while ago, and I dont recall where I saw the article.
I have a PACO signal tracer. It does work, but has a noticable hum. So,
I plan to recap it. There are only 4 paper caps, so that's easy. But
there is a FOUR part electrolytic 20 - 20 - 10 - 10 450V (2 are 350V).
There are at least 6 resistors across those pins, and several wires as
well. That chassis is not very large either. Some sort of strip that
could go to each cap terminal (but insulate if from the original cap
innards) would be ideal.
Anyone know what this guy is talking about?
Yea, I am familiar with the standard terminal strips, but there is not
much room to use those which have a terninal NEXT TO the one that
mormally gets screwed to the chassis. Stuffing the can seems like too
much work.
I did find one NEW two part can, which is 32 - 32 at 500V. (for not too
bad of a price $13). I suppose I could use that to replace the two 20mf
caps, but still have the two 10s to deal with. Finding three part cans
seems near impossible, unless I want to pay ridiculous prices and most
of them are NOS. (For electrolytics, I wont use NOS caps), nor will I
pay $50 or more for an any cap, much less NOS.
Anyone have any idea what these strips are, or know of a place where I
can get at least a 3 part cap for a fair price? (like 20 - 20 - 10 or 20
- 10 - 10)?
Oftentimes you can relocate radial lead caps to an easier location
rather than what the existing electrolytic gives you. For example, the
first electrolytic could be placed at the lug of the rectifier
cathode and the ground lug for the center tap of the transformer.
secondary.
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